LinuxGuruz
  • Last 5 Forum Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post


The Web Only This Site
  • BOOKMARK

  • ADD TO FAVORITES

  • REFERENCES


  • MARC

    Mailing list ARChives
    - Search by -
     Subjects
     Authors
     Bodies





    FOLDOC

    Computing Dictionary




  • Text Link Ads






  • LINUX man pages
  • Linux Man Page Viewer


    The following form allows you to view linux man pages.

    Command:

    watch

    
    
    

    SYNOPSIS

           watch  [-dhvt]  [-n  <seconds>]  [--differences[=cumulative]]  [--help]
           [--interval=<seconds>] [--no-title] [--version] <command>
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           watch runs command repeatedly, displaying its output (the first screen-
           full).   This  allows you to watch the program output change over time.
           By default, the program is run every 2 seconds; use -n or --interval to
           specify a different interval.
    
           The  -d  or  --differences  flag will highlight the differences between
           successive  updates.   The  --cumulative  option   makes   highlighting
           "sticky",  presenting a running display of all positions that have ever
           changed.  The -t or --no-title option turns off the header showing  the
           interval,  command, and current time at the top of the display, as well
           as the following blank line.
    
           watch will run until interrupted.
    
    
    

    NOTE

           Note that command is given to "sh -c" which means that you may need  to
           use extra quoting to get the desired effect.
    
           Note  that  POSIX  option  processing  is used (i.e., option processing
           stops at the first non-option argument).  This means that  flags  after
           command don't get interpreted by watch itself.
    
    
    

    EXAMPLES

           To watch for mail, you might do
    
                  watch -n 60 from
    
           To watch the contents of a directory change, you could use
    
                  watch -d ls -l
    
           If you're only interested in files owned by user joe, you might use
    
                  watch -d 'ls -l | fgrep joe'
    
           To see the effects of quoting, try these out
    
                  watch echo $$
    
                  watch echo '$$'
    
                  watch echo "'"'$$'"'"
    
           You can watch for your administrator to install the latest kernel with
    
                  watch uname -r
    
    
                                      1999 Apr 3                          WATCH(1)
    
  • MORE RESOURCE


  • Linux

    The Distributions





    Linux

    The Software





    Linux

    The News



  • MARKETING






  • Toll Free

webmaster@linuxguruz.com
Copyright © 1999 - 2016 by LinuxGuruz