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    The following form allows you to view linux man pages.

    Command:

    strtod

    
    
    

    SYNOPSIS

           #include <stdlib.h>
    
           double strtod(const char *nptr, char **endptr);
           float strtof(const char *nptr, char **endptr);
           long double strtold(const char *nptr, char **endptr);
    
       Feature Test Macro Requirements for glibc (see feature_test_macros(7)):
    
           strtof(), strtold():
               _XOPEN_SOURCE >= 600 || _ISOC99_SOURCE ||
               _POSIX_C_SOURCE >= 200112L;
               or cc -std=c99
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           The strtod(), strtof(), and strtold() functions convert the initial
           portion of the string pointed to by nptr to double, float, and long
           double representation, respectively.
    
           The expected form of the (initial portion of the) string is optional
           leading white space as recognized by isspace(3), an optional plus ('+')
           or minus sign ('-') and then either (i) a decimal number, or (ii) a
           hexadecimal number, or (iii) an infinity, or (iv) a NAN (not-a-number).
    
           A decimal number consists of a nonempty sequence of decimal digits pos-
           sibly containing a radix character (decimal point, locale-dependent,
           usually '.'), optionally followed by a decimal exponent.  A decimal
           exponent consists of an 'E' or 'e', followed by an optional plus or
           minus sign, followed by a nonempty sequence of decimal digits, and
           indicates multiplication by a power of 10.
    
           A hexadecimal number consists of a "0x" or "0X" followed by a nonempty
           sequence of hexadecimal digits possibly containing a radix character,
           optionally followed by a binary exponent.  A binary exponent consists
           of a 'P' or 'p', followed by an optional plus or minus sign, followed
           by a nonempty sequence of decimal digits, and indicates multiplication
           by a power of 2.  At least one of radix character and binary exponent
           must be present.
    
           An infinity is either "INF" or "INFINITY", disregarding case.
    
           A NAN is "NAN" (disregarding case) optionally followed by '(', a
           sequence of characters, followed by ')'.  The character string speci-
           fies in an implementation-dependent way the type of NAN.
    
    
    

    RETURN VALUE

           These functions return the converted value, if any.
    
           If endptr is not NULL, a pointer to the character after the last char-
           acter used in the conversion is stored in the location referenced by
           endptr.
    
           exceptions.  These functions can be safely used in multithreaded appli-
           cations, as long as setlocale(3) is not called to change the locale
           during their execution.
    
    
    

    CONFORMING TO

           C89 describes strtod(), C99 describes the other two functions.
    
    
    

    NOTES

           Since 0 can legitimately be returned on both success and failure, the
           calling program should set errno to 0 before the call, and then deter-
           mine if an error occurred by checking whether errno has a nonzero value
           after the call.
    
    
    

    EXAMPLE

           See the example on the strtol(3) manual page; the use of the functions
           described in this manual page is similar.
    
    
    

    SEE ALSO

           atof(3), atoi(3), atol(3), strtol(3), strtoul(3)
    
    
    

    Linux 2014-01-22 STRTOD(3)

    
    
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