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    The following form allows you to view linux man pages.

    Command:

    request-key.conf

    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           This  file  is used by the /sbin/request-key program to determine which
           program it should run to instantiate a key.
    
           request-key works scans through the file a line  at  a  time  until  it
           finds  a  match,  which  it  will then use. If it doesn't find a match,
           it'll return an error and the kernel will automatically negate the key.
    
           Any  blank line or line beginning with a hash mark '#' is considered to
           be a comment and ignored.
    
           All other lines are assumed to be command lines with a number of  white
           space separated fields:
    
           <op> <type> <description> <callout-info> <prog> <arg1> <arg2> ...
    
           The  first  four  fields  are  used  to  match the parameters passed to
           request-key by the kernel. op is the operation type; currently the only
           supported operation is "create".
    
           type, description and callout-info match the three parameters passed to
           keyctl request2 or the request_key() system call.  Each  of  these  may
           contain  one  or  more  asterisk  '*'  characters as wildcards anywhere
           within the string.
    
           Should a match be made, the program specified by <prog> will be exec'd.
           This  must  have  a fully qualified path name. argv[0] will be set from
           the part of the program name that follows the last slash '/' character.
    
           If the program name is prefixed with a pipe bar character '|', then the
           program will be forked and exec'd attached to three pipes. The  callout
           information  will be piped to it on it's stdin and the intended payload
           data will be retrieved from its stdout. Anything sent to stderr will be
           posted  in  syslog. If the program exits 0, then /sbin/request-key will
           attempt to instantiate the key with the data read from  stdout.  If  it
           fails  in  any  other way, then request-key will attempt to execute the
           appropriate 'negate' operation command.
    
           The program arguments can be substituted with various macros. Only com-
           plete argument substitution is supported - macro substitutions can't be
           embedded. All macros begin with a percent character  '%'.  An  argument
           beginning  with two percent characters will have one of them discarded.
    
           The following macros are supported:
    
                  %o    Operation type
                  %k    Key ID
                  %t    Key type
                  %d    Key description
                  %c    Callout information
                  %u    Key UID
                  %g    Key GID
    
    
    

    EXAMPLE

           A basic file will be installed in  the  /etc.  This  will  contain  two
           debugging lines that can be used to test the installation:
    
                  create user debug:* negate /bin/keyctl negate %k 30 %S
                  create user debug:loop:* * |/bin/cat
                  create  user  debug:* * /usr/share/keyutils/request-key-debug.sh
                  %k %d %c %S
                  negate * * * /bin/keyctl negate %k 30 %S
    
           This is set up so that something like:
    
                  keyctl request2 user debug:xxxx negate
    
           will create a negative user-defined key, something like:
    
                  keyctl request2 user debug:yyyy spoon
    
           will create an instantiated user-defined key with "Debug spoon" as  the
           payload, and something like:
    
                  keyctl request2 user debug:loop:zzzz abcdefghijkl
    
           will  create an instantiated user-defined key with the callout informa-
           tion as the payload.
    
    
    

    FILES

           /etc/request-key.conf
    
    
    

    SEE ALSO

           keyctl(1), request-key.conf(5)
    
    
    

    Linux 11 July 2005 REQUEST-KEY.CONF(5)

    
    
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