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    Command:

    mbsinit

    
    
    

    SYNOPSIS

           #include <wchar.h>
    
           int mbsinit(const mbstate_t *ps);
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           Character  conversion between the multibyte representation and the wide
           character representation uses  conversion  state,  of  type  mbstate_t.
           Conversion  of  a string uses a finite-state machine; when it is inter-
           rupted after the complete conversion of a number of characters, it  may
           need  to  save a state for processing the remaining characters.  Such a
           conversion state is needed for the sake of encodings such  as  ISO-2022
           and UTF-7.
    
           The  initial  state  is  the  state at the beginning of conversion of a
           string.  There are two kinds of state: The one  used  by  multibyte  to
           wide  character conversion functions, such as mbsrtowcs(3), and the one
           used by wide character to multibyte conversion functions, such as wcsr-
           tombs(3), but they both fit in a mbstate_t, and they both have the same
           representation for an initial state.
    
           For 8-bit encodings, all states are equivalent to  the  initial  state.
           For multibyte encodings like UTF-8, EUC-*, BIG5 or SJIS, the wide char-
           acter to  multibyte  conversion  functions  never  produce  non-initial
           states,  but  the multibyte to wide-character conversion functions like
           mbrtowc(3) do produce non-initial states when interrupted in the middle
           of a character.
    
           One  possible  way to create an mbstate_t in initial state is to set it
           to zero:
    
               mbstate_t state;
               memset(&state,0,sizeof(mbstate_t));
    
           On Linux, the following works as  well,  but  might  generate  compiler
           warnings:
    
               mbstate_t state = { 0 };
    
           The  function  mbsinit()  tests  whether  *ps corresponds to an initial
           state.
    
    
    

    RETURN VALUE

           mbsinit() returns nonzero if *ps is an initial state, or if ps is NULL.
           Otherwise it returns 0.
    
    
    

    ATTRIBUTES

       Multithreading (see pthreads(7))
           The mbsinit() function is thread-safe.
    
    
    

    CONFORMING TO

           C99.
    
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