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    The following form allows you to view linux man pages.

    Command:

    hosts.equiv

    
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           The hosts.equiv file allows or denies hosts and users to use the r-com-
           mands (e.g., rlogin, rsh, or rcp) without supplying a password.
    
           The file uses the following format:
    
           [ + | - ] [hostname] [username]
    
           The hostname is the name of a host which is logically equivalent to the
           local host.  Users logged into that host are allowed  to  access  like-
           named  user  accounts  on  the local host without supplying a password.
           The hostname may be (optionally) preceded by a plus (+) sign.   If  the
           plus  sign is used alone it allows any host to access your system.  You
           can explicitly deny access to a host by preceding  the  hostname  by  a
           minus  (-)  sign.   Users from that host must always supply a password.
           For security reasons you should always use the FQDN of the hostname and
           not the short hostname.
    
           The  username  entry grants a specific user access to all user accounts
           (except root) without supplying a password.  That means the user is NOT
           restricted  to  like-named  accounts.  The username may be (optionally)
           preceded by a plus (+) sign.  You can also explicitly deny access to  a
           specific  user  by  preceding the username with a minus (-) sign.  This
           says that the user is not trusted no matter what other entries for that
           host exist.
    
           Netgroups can be specified by preceding the netgroup by an @ sign.
    
           Be extremely careful when using the plus (+) sign.  A simple typograph-
           ical error could result in a standalone plus sign.  A  standalone  plus
           sign is a wildcard character that means "any host"!
    
    
    

    FILES

           /etc/hosts.equiv
    
    
    

    NOTES

           Some  systems  will  honor  the  contents of this file only when it has
           owner root and no write permission for anybody else.   Some  exception-
           ally paranoid systems even require that there be no other hard links to
           the file.
    
           Modern systems use the Pluggable Authentication Modules library  (PAM).
           With  PAM  a  standalone  plus  sign is considered a wildcard character
           which means "any host" only when the word promiscuous is added  to  the
           auth  component line in your PAM file for the particular service (e.g.,
           rlogin).
    
    
    

    SEE ALSO

           rhosts(5), rlogind(8), rshd(8)
    
    
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