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    Command:

    git-revert

    
    
    

    SYNOPSIS

           git revert [--edit | --no-edit] [-n] [-m parent-number] [-s] <commit>
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           Given one existing commit, revert the change the patch introduces, and
           record a new commit that records it. This requires your working tree to
           be clean (no modifications from the HEAD commit).
    
           Note: git revert is used to record a new commit to reverse the effect
           of an earlier commit (often a faulty one). If you want to throw away
           all uncommitted changes in your working directory, you should see git-
           reset(1), particularly the --hard option. If you want to extract
           specific files as they were in another commit, you should see git-
           checkout(1), specifically the git checkout <commit> -- <filename>
           syntax. Take care with these alternatives as both will discard
           uncommitted changes in your working directory.
    
    
    

    OPTIONS

           <commit>
               Commit to revert. For a more complete list of ways to spell commit
               names, see "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in git-rev-parse(1).
    
           -e, --edit
               With this option, git revert will let you edit the commit message
               prior to committing the revert. This is the default if you run the
               command from a terminal.
    
           -m parent-number, --mainline parent-number
               Usually you cannot revert a merge because you do not know which
               side of the merge should be considered the mainline. This option
               specifies the parent number (starting from 1) of the mainline and
               allows revert to reverse the change relative to the specified
               parent.
    
               Reverting a merge commit declares that you will never want the tree
               changes brought in by the merge. As a result, later merges will
               only bring in tree changes introduced by commits that are not
               ancestors of the previously reverted merge. This may or may not be
               what you want.
    
               See the revert-a-faulty-merge How-To[1] for more details.
    
           --no-edit
               With this option, git revert will not start the commit message
               editor.
    
           -n, --no-commit
               Usually the command automatically creates a commit with a commit
               log message stating which commit was reverted. This flag applies
               the change necessary to revert the named commit to your working
               tree and the index, but does not make the commit. In addition, when
               this option is used, your index does not have to match the HEAD
    
           <git@vger.kernel.org[3]>.
    
    
    

    GIT

           Part of the git(1) suite
    
    
    

    NOTES

            1. revert-a-faulty-merge How-To
               file:///usr/share/doc/git-1.7.1/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt
    
            2. gitster@pobox.com
               mailto:gitster@pobox.com
    
            3. git@vger.kernel.org
               mailto:git@vger.kernel.org
    
    
    

    Git 1.7.1 03/04/2013 GIT-REVERT(1)

    
    
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