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    Command:

    dreml

    
    
    
    

    SYNOPSIS

           #include <math.h>
    
           /* The C99 versions */
           double remainder(double x, double y);
           float remainderf(float x, float y);
           long double remainderl(long double x, long double y);
    
           /* Obsolete synonyms */
           double drem(double x, double y);
           float dremf(float x, float y);
           long double dreml(long double x, long double y);
    
           Link with -lm.
    
       Feature Test Macro Requirements for glibc (see feature_test_macros(7)):
    
           remainder():
               _SVID_SOURCE || _BSD_SOURCE || _XOPEN_SOURCE >= 500 ||
               _XOPEN_SOURCE && _XOPEN_SOURCE_EXTENDED || _ISOC99_SOURCE ||
               _POSIX_C_SOURCE >= 200112L;
               or cc -std=c99
           remainderf(), remainderl():
               _BSD_SOURCE || _SVID_SOURCE || _XOPEN_SOURCE >= 600 ||
               _ISOC99_SOURCE || _POSIX_C_SOURCE >= 200112L;
               or cc -std=c99
           drem(), dremf(), dreml():
               _SVID_SOURCE || _BSD_SOURCE
    
    
    

    DESCRIPTION

           The  remainder()  function  computes  the remainder of dividing x by y.
           The return value is x-n*y, where n is the value x / y, rounded  to  the
           nearest integer.  If the absolute value of x-n*y is 0.5, n is chosen to
           be even.
    
           These functions are  unaffected  by  the  current  rounding  mode  (see
           fenv(3)).
    
           The drem() function does precisely the same thing.
    
    
    

    RETURN VALUE

           On success, these functions return the floating-point remainder, x-n*y.
           If the return value is 0, it has the sign of x.
    
           If x or y is a NaN, a NaN is returned.
    
           If x is an infinity, and y is not a NaN, a domain error occurs,  and  a
           NaN is returned.
    
           If  y  is zero, and x is not a NaN, a domain error occurs, and a NaN is
           returned.
                  (FE_INVALID) is raised.
    
    
    

    CONFORMING TO

           The functions remainder(), remainderf(), and remainderl() are specified
           in C99 and POSIX.1-2001.
    
           The function drem() is from 4.3BSD.  The float and long double variants
           dremf() and dreml() exist on some systems, such as  Tru64  and  glibc2.
           Avoid the use of these functions in favor of remainder() etc.
    
    
    

    BUGS

           The call
    
               remainder(nan(""), 0);
    
           returns  a  NaN,  as  expected,  but  wrongly causes a domain error; it
           should yield a silent NaN.
    
    
    

    EXAMPLE

           The call "remainder(29.0, 3.0)" returns -1.
    
    
    

    SEE ALSO

           div(3), fmod(3), remquo(3)
    
                                      2010-09-20                      REMAINDER(3)
    
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